Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Macular Degeneration


Macular Degeneration

“I have a family history of macular degeneration.  Is there anything I can do to help keep this from happening to me?”
Macular Degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss, affecting more than 10 million Americans, and at present is considered an incurable eye disease.
Macular Degeneration is caused by the deterioration of the central portion of the retina, the inside back layer of the eye that records the images we see and sends them via the optic nerve from the eye to the brain. The retina’s central portion, known as the macula, is responsible for focusing central vision in the eye, and it controls our ability to read, drive a car, recognize faces or colors, and see objects in fine detail.
Our diets include many processed foods that are lacking in the nutrients required to maximize macular pigment.  In addition, exposure to blue light from digital devices can contribute to macular disease and limit visual performance.
Recently a company has come out with a supplement that seems to be helping patients maintain a healthier macula.  Studies have shown that visual performance can be improved at any age following supplementation with a formulation that contains all three of macular pigment’s constituent nutrients.  MacuHealth with LMZ3 has been shown to appreciably improve visual performance and has also been shown to outperform alternative formulations.  We have started recommending this supplement to our at risk patients to help protect their macula from lifelong retinal injury, and reduce the risk of developing macular disease. 
We are now carrying this supplement in our office.  If you feel that you would like to try this, please call the office for an appointment with one of our eye doctors.

x

Monday, September 18, 2017

Eyewear Fashion - Fall 2017


Eyewear Fashion - Fall 2017

The buyers from our office just returned from Vision Expo West in Las Vegas, where some of the world's most fashionable eyewear designers unveiled their newest collections.  We fell in love with a few new lines that we will be bringing into our office and really noticed some new trends for the patient who likes to be fashion-forward!  (Stay tuned to our Facebook page over the next week as we unveil some new finds!)

TREND #1 - ROUND SHAPE


Round is vogue for eyewear and the person who wants to be wearing the latest trendy shape in fashion for eyeglasses and sunglasses will rush out and buy a pair of round specs!  The size ranges from the tiny "John Lennon" size round to the oversized movie-star glam.  We noticed round shapes made of classic tortoise, plated titanium in many colors, and many variations with acetate.






TREND #2 - DOUBLE BRIDGE

A double bridge is the hottest accompaniment to any shape, including the trendy round.  We noticed that the double bridge is taking many forms from the 1980's classic to edgier extended and shaped double bridges.  One thing for sure, if you like to set the trends, find your favorite shape in eyeglass frames and throw in a double bridge!



TREND #3 - MIRROR FLASH COATING



You've seen your favorite movie star wearing colorful mirror sunglasses and that is another of this year's biggest trend.  Unlike the classic mirror lens, the flash coating allows you to see the wearer's eyes through the sunglass.  The flash coating comes in many color variations from solid, to gradient, to rainbow.  From conservative to flashy, there is a flash mirror coat for everyone! (We highly recommend getting an anti-reflective coat on the back side of the sunglasses, especially when you have a mirror coat.



TREND #4 - MIXED MEDIA

We've seen it creeping into the fashion scene for a while now, but the frame that combines multiple materials and textures is bigger now than ever.  We love the designers who have figured out a way to combine a light-weight titanium with a light-weight acetate to create a masterpiece eyewear.  We're also seeing acetate fronts with metal sides, and metal fronts with acetate sides. Layers and combinations of materials set your face apart from the rest.  

TREND #5 - COLORED LENSES


You might have noticed recently that models appear to be wearing lightly tinted colorful lenses.  This is another new trend we noticed this fall.  These tinted lenses aren't worn as much for blocking the brightness of the sun, as they are for making a fashion statement. The colors and intensity seem endless. The "blush" of color lets people know you are fashion forward!






TREND #6 - CRYSTAL

Crystal frames started emerging on the fashion several years ago, but now they have arrived in a very big way!  For those special people who could rock the true crystal, great for you!  I've seen you walking down the street and you look amazing!!  For those who couldn't "pull it off,"  more frame lines have introduced crystal with a slight tint of color.  We have seen slight grey crystal, soft pink blush and soft champagne to name a few.  We also noticed the use of crystal components either in the frame face or temple, for just a touch of the trendy material. Now the "crystals" are available to a much larger demographic of eyewear lovers!

Stop by one of our optical boutiques and let our opticians and frame techs help you find the perfect trend-setting eyewear for your face and prescription!


Saturday, August 12, 2017

SOLAR ECLIPSE SAFETY - PART 3




HOW TO VIEW THE SOLAR ECLIPSE


A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon blocks any part of the Sun. On Monday, August 21, 2017, a solar eclipse will be visible (weather permitting) across all of North America. The whole continent will experience a partial eclipse lasting 2 to 3 hours. Halfway through the event, anyone within a roughly 70-mile-wide path from Oregon to South Carolina (http://bit.ly/1xuYxSu) will experience a brief total eclipse, when the Moon completely blocks the Sun’s bright face for up to 2 minutes 40 seconds, turning day into night and making visible the otherwise hidden solar corona — the Sun’s outer atmosphere — one of nature’s most awesome sights. Bright stars and planets will become visible as well. 


Looking directly at the Sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the Moon entirely blocks the Sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality (http://bit.ly/1xuYxSu). 

The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” (example shown at left) or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the Sun. To date four manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and hand-held solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics (A Memphis Company), Thousand Oaks Optical, and TSE 17.

 • Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter. Always supervise children using solar filters. 

• Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright Sun. After glancing at the Sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the Sun. 

• Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the Sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device. 

• If you are within the path of totality (http://bit.ly/1xuYxSu), remove your solar filter only when the Moon completely covers the Sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright Sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases. 

An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed Sun is pinhole projection. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other. With your back to the Sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the Sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse. 


A solar eclipse is one of nature’s grandest spectacles. By following these simple rules, you can safely enjoy the view and be rewarded with memories to last a lifetime. More information: 
eclipse.aas.org                  eclipse2017.nasa.gov

As a service to our patients, Memphis Family Vision will be sharing several articles about safely viewing the eclipse.  These articles come directly from the American Optometric Association, the leading authority on quality care and an advocate for our nation's health, representing more than 44,000 doctors of optometry (O.D.), optometric professionals and optometry students. While the doctors at Memphis Family Vision recommend never looking directly at the sun, they realize the excitement surrounding the eclipse and want patients to take the utmost care and caution when attempting to view this phenomenon.

Monday, August 7, 2017

SOLAR ECLIPSE SAFETY - PART 2



SOLAR ECLIPSE - SAFE VIEWING TIPS

ARE YOU READY FOR THE SOLAR ECLIPSE ACROSS AMERICA?

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of the United States will have a solar eclipse. The moon will cover at least part of the sun for 2 to 3 hours. Halfway through, anyone within a narrow path from Oregon to South Carolina will experience a brief total eclipse. The moon will completely block the sun's bright face for up to 2 minutes 40 seconds. Day will turn into night, and (weather permitting) one of nature's most awesome sights will become visible: the sun's shimmering outer atmosphere, or corona. The American Optometric Association, in partnership with the American Astronomical Society, is providing detailed information so that you can safely view the eclipse.

Here are four ways to safely view a solar eclipse:  
  1. Use approved solar eclipse viewers. The only safe way to view a partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as "eclipse glasses" or viewers that meet international standard ISO 12312-2 for safe viewing. Sunglasses, smoked glass, unfiltered telescopes or magnifiers, and polarizing filters are unsafe. If you can't find eclipse viewers, build a pinhole projector to watch the eclipse.
  2. Technique of the pros. Before looking at the sun, cover your eyes with the eclipse viewers while standing still. Glance at the sun, turn away and then remove your filter. Do not remove the filter while looking at the sun.
  3. Totality awesome. Only within the path of totality-and once the moon completely blocks the sun-can eclipse viewers safely be removed to view totality. Once the sun begins reappearing, however, viewers must be replaced. 
  4. Visit your doctor of optometry. If you should experience discomfort or vision problems following the eclipse, visit your local doctor of optometry for a comprehensive eye examination.   
As a service to our patients, Memphis Family Vision will be sharing several articles about safely viewing the eclipse.  These articles come directly from the American Optometric Association, the leading authority on quality care and an advocate for our nation's health, representing more than 44,000 doctors of optometry (O.D.), optometric professionals and optometry students. While the doctors at Memphis Family Vision recommend never looking directly at the sun, they realize the excitement surrounding the eclipse and want patients to take the utmost care and caution when attempting to view this phenomenon.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

SOLAR ECLIPSE SAFETY - PART 1



SOLAR ECLIPSE SAFETY
American Optometric Association Encourages Safe and Fun Viewing of August Eclipse


On August 21, a total solar eclipse will touch the U.S. mainland for the first time since 1979, following a path that crosses the country from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Tens of millions of people who live within a 70-mile radius of its cross-country track will witness the eclipse in totality (the sun completely blocked by the moon) while millions of others outside of it will enjoy a partial eclipse. The American Optometric Association (AOA) is urging Americans to view the eclipse with proper eye protection to avoid any temporary or permanent eye damage from the sun.

“The eclipse is a rare moment that the whole country is able to share,” said THE DOCS. “As America’s primary eye health and vision care experts, doctors of optometry are excited to help everyone enjoy it safely by protecting their eyes.”

To ensure spectators won’t miss the remarkable sight, the AOA is sharing a few tips for safe viewing:

·       Get centered and enjoy the view. Within the path of totality, you can safely witness the two or more minutes when the moon completely covers the sun with the naked eye. Otherwise, your eyes should always be protected by verified viewing tools. Never look directly at the sun without eye protection, even briefly. Visit eclipse.aas.org to access eclipse duration charts.

·       Know your duration. Outside of the path of totality, always use solar filters. O.D.s want to reinforce that the only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters or other ISO-certified filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers. The AOA encourages ordering solar eclipse glasses in advance and recommends referring to the American Astronomical Society’s (AAS) site for a list of manufacturers.

·       Be aware of harmful solar exposure. If you stare at the sun without protection, you may experience damage to your retina (the tissue at the back of your eye) called “solar retinopathy.” This damage can occur without any sensation of pain, since the retina does not have pain receptors. The injury can be temporary or permanent. Visit your local doctor of optometry immediately if an accident occurs.

·       Visit your doctor of optometry. Check in with the Doctors at Memphis Family Vision for information about safely viewing the eclipse. If you experience any problems with your eyes or vision after the eclipse, our office will be able to provide you with the medical care you need.


To access additional information and educational materials on the solar eclipse, visit aoa.org/2017eclipse.

As a service to our patients, Memphis Family Vision will be sharing several articles about safely viewing the eclipse.  These articles come directly from the American Optometric Association, the leading authority on quality care and an advocate for our nation's health, representing more than 44,000 doctors of optometry (O.D.), optometric professionals and optometry students. While the doctors at Memphis Family Vision recommend never looking directly at the sun, they realize the excitement surrounding the eclipse and want patients to take the utmost care and caution when attempting to view this phenomenon.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Blue Light Protection



Blue Light Protection

The average person today spends over 10 hours per day looking at a screen*.  This can be a computer screen, a cell phone, a tablet, an e-reader or other digital device.  Blue light rays emitted from these devices may cause eye strain, headaches, and even sleep disorders. 

Eyeglass lens companies are now producing a variety of blue-blocking lenses and lens coatings. These are available in both prescription and non-prescription eyewear under a variety of names, and with a variety of purposes.

Parents are starting to realize the value of blue-blocking lenses for their school age children and have started asking for this feature in their children’s eyewear.  Many are purchasing special glasses to keep at the home computer so that it is readily available.

People who wear blue-blocking lenses have reported**:
·         98.2% have noticed significant sleep improvement
·         99.1% have noticed that their eyes feel more “relaxed” indoors
·         65.1% have noticed a significant reduction in headaches and migraines.


Remember to ask your eye doctor about which type of blue-blocking lens will best suit your needs for viewing your computer and other digital devices, and protecting your eyes from blue light.

Sources:  
*Nielson survery reported by CNN, July '16
**Blue Tech wearer survey. Bluetechlenses.com